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Stuart Neville

Biography

Stuart Neville

Stuart Neville's debut novel, THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST (published in the UK as THE TWELVE), won the Mystery/Thriller category of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and was picked as one of the top crime novels of 2009 by both the New York Times and the LA Times. He has been shortlisted for various awards, including the MWA Edgar, CWA Dagger, Theakstons Old Peculier Novel of the Year, Barry, Macavity and Dilys awards, as well as the Irish Book Awards Crime Novel of the Year.

He has since published nine more critically acclaimed books, two of which were under the pen name Haylen Beck. In 2020, Soho Press published his first short story collection, THE TRAVELLER AND OTHER STORIES.

Stuart's novels have been translated into various languages, including German, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Swedish, Greek and more. The French edition of THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST won Le Prix Mystère de la Critique du Meilleur Roman Étranger and Grand Prix du Roman Noir Étranger.

Stuart Neville

Books by Stuart Neville

by Stuart Neville - Fiction, Mystery, Short Stories, Suspense, Thriller

Since his debut novel, the modern classic THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST, was published a decade ago, Stuart Neville has published eight other critically acclaimed novels and achieved international recognition as one of crime fiction’s great living writers. Now, for the first time, Neville offers readers a collection of his short fiction --- 12 chilling stories that traverse and blend the genres of noir, horror and speculative fiction, and bring the history and lore of Neville’s native Northern Ireland to glittering life. The collection concludes with the long-awaited novella “The Traveller,” the companion piece to THE GHOSTS OF BELFAST and COLLUSION.

by Stuart Neville - Fiction, Mystery, Psychological Suspense, Psychological Thriller, Suspense, Thriller

Henry Garrick, a local car dealer who was maimed in an accident five months before, has apparently taken his own life. A simple case, it should be wrapped up in a few days. But something doesn’t feel right to Belfast detective Serena Flanagan, despite the fact that there is no evidence of foul play. As she investigates, Flanagan interviews Roberta Garrick, Henry’s widow, who is comforted in her grief by Reverend Peter McKay, rector of the local church and a close family friend. But with the secrets McKay is keeping, he is in no position to help anyone. As Flanagan picks at the threads of the dead man’s life, a disturbing picture emerges, and she realizes that Roberta is not what she seems.

by Stuart Neville - Fiction, Mystery, Suspense, Thriller

Ciaran Devine, who made Belfast headlines seven years ago as the “schoolboy killer,” is about to walk free. At the age of 12, he confessed to the brutal murder of his foster father; his testimony mitigated the sentence of his older brother, Thomas, who was also found at the crime scene, covered in blood. But DCI Serena Flanagan, the only officer who could convince a frightened Ciaran to speak, has silently harbored doubts about his confession all this time. She will soon discover that even closed cases can unleash terror on the streets of Belfast.

by Stuart Neville - Fiction, Suspense, Thriller

Rea Carlisle has inherited a house from an uncle she never knew. It doesn’t take her long to clear out the remaining possessions, but to her horror she discovers a leather-bound book, its pages filled with locks of hair and fingernails: a catalog of victims. Rea turns to the only person she can think of: an old boyfriend, police inspector Jack Lennon. He has more than enough problems already, but a gruesome murder brings the dead man’s terrifying journal to the top of the Belfast police’s priority list.

by Stuart Neville - Fiction, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Mystery

As the Irish people prepare to welcome President John F. Kennedy to the land of his ancestors, a German national is murdered. This is the third foreigner to die within a few days, and Minister for Justice Charles Haughey wants the killing to end lest a shameful secret be exposed: the dead men were all Nazis granted asylum by the Irish government in the years following World War II.