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Meg Waite Clayton

Biography

Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton is a New York Times bestselling author of seven novels, most recently THE LAST TRAIN TO LONDON. Her previous novels include the Langum Prize--honored THE RACE TO PARIS; THE LANGUAGE OF LIGHT, a finalist for the Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction (now the PEN/Bellwether); and THE WEDNESDAY SISTERS, one of Entertainment Weekly’s 25 Essential Best Friend Novels of all time. She has also written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Forbes and public radio, often on the subject of the particular challenges women face.

Meg Waite Clayton

Books by Meg Waite Clayton

by Meg Waite Clayton - Fiction, Historical Fiction

In 1936, the Nazis are little more than loud, brutish bores to 15-year-old Stephan Neuman, the son of a wealthy and influential Jewish family and budding playwright. Stephan’s best friend and companion is the brilliant Žofie-Helene, a Christian girl whose mother edits a progressive, anti-Nazi newspaper. But the two adolescents’ carefree innocence is shattered when the Nazis take control. Truus Wijsmuller, a member of the Dutch resistance, risks her life smuggling Jewish children out of Nazi Germany to the nations that will take them. It is a mission that becomes even more dangerous after the Anschluss --- Hitler’s annexation of Austria --- as, across Europe, countries close their borders to the growing number of refugees desperate to escape.

by Meg Waite Clayton - Fiction, Historical Fiction

Key West, 1936. Headstrong, accomplished journalist Martha Gellhorn is confident with words but less so with men when she meets disheveled literary titan Ernest Hemingway in a dive bar. Their friendship flourishes into something undeniable in Madrid while they’re covering the Spanish Civil War. Martha reveres him. The very married Hemingway is taken with Martha. And as Hemingway tells her, the most powerful love stories are always set against the fury of war. With their romance unfolding as they travel the globe, Martha establishes herself as one of the world’s foremost war correspondents, and Hemingway begins the novel that will win him the Nobel Prize for Literature.

by Meg Waite Clayton - Fiction, Historical Fiction

Opening in Normandy on June 29, 1944, THE RACE FOR PARIS follows two American female war correspondents on their quest to document (and make) history by covering the Allied liberation of Paris. Jane is a young, single journalist for the Nashville Banner. When she’s assigned to cover a field hospital, she meets Olivia, “Liv,” an Associated Press photographer. However, due to their gender, Liv and Jane are constantly confronted by red tape. Reluctantly accompanied by Fletcher, a male British military reporter, the two women go AWOL and chase their story through gunfire, carnage and death scarring the French countryside. 

by Meg Waite Clayton - Fiction, Women's Fiction

Hope Tantry arrives at the small cottage where her mother, Ally, spent the last years of her life. Ally had used the cottage as a writer’s retreat while she worked on her unpublished biography of Beatrix Potter, yet Hope knows little about her mother’s time there. Traveling with Hope are friends Anna Page and Julie, who are grappling with issues of a different era. They’ve come to help Hope sort through her mother’s personal effects, yet what they find is a tangled family history.

by Meg Waite Clayton - Fiction

When Bee hears that Tess, her younger sister, is missing, she returns home to London immediately. She expects to find Tess and give her the usual big sister lecture scolding her flighty behavior --- but Bee never could have prepared for what really awaits her.