Skip to main content

Brock Clarke

Biography

Brock Clarke

Brock Clarke is an award-winning author of seven works of fiction, including the bestselling AN ARSONIST'S GUIDE TO WRITERS' HOMES IN NEW ENGLAND. He lives in Maine and teaches at Bowdoin College.

Brock Clarke

Books by Brock Clarke

by Brock Clarke - Fiction

Calvin Bledsoe’s journey begins with the death of his mother. An internationally known theologian and an expert on all things John Calvin, she had been the dominant force in her son’s existence. At her funeral, Calvin is introduced to his aunt Beatrice, who whisks him off to Europe for a grand adventure. As they traverse the continent, it becomes apparent that her clandestine behavior is leading him into danger. Facing a menagerie of antiquities thieves, secret agents, religious fanatics, and an ex-wife who is stalking him, Calvin begins to suspect there might be some meaning behind the madness. But first, he has to figure out why he has been kidnapped, why his aunt has disappeared, and who the hell burned down his house in Maine.

by Brock Clarke - Fiction, Short Stories

The title story of acclaimed writer Brock Clarke’s new collection delivers a cringingly biting dissection of racial attitudes in contemporary America. Clarke also turns his eagle eye to subjects like PTSD, the fate of child actors, and, most especially, marital discord in stories like “Considering Lizzie Borden, Her Axe, My Wife” and “The Misunderstandings.” In “The Pity Palace,” a reclusive husband in Florence, Italy, who believes his wife has left him for a famous novelist, sells tickets to tourists anxious to meet someone more miserable than they.

by Brock Clarke - Fiction

Take the format of a spy thriller, shape it around real-life incidents involving international terrorism, leaven it with dark, dry humor, toss in a love rectangle, give everybody a gun, and let everything play out in the outer reaches of upstate New York. THE HAPPIEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD is a darkly funny tale of paranoia and the all-American obsession with security and the conspiracies that threaten it, written in a tone that is simultaneously filled with wonder and anger in almost equal parts.

by Brock Clarke - Historical Fiction

Part literary satire, part mystery, EXLEY unleashes the enormous talent of a writer whom critics have compared to Richard Ford and John Irving and whose work has been called “absurdly hilarious” (Entertainment Weekly) and “wildly entertaining” (Daily Candy).